Nature's Place

The Face …

She was about 8 inches long so I settled for the most intelligent aspect of any creature, the face.

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In the face can be found the primary characteristics of any being. Seeing them/it is the job.

And the job is to negate what gets in the way of seeing what is, the movie pictures of mind.

I was at the waterfront to see the stars while enjoying a walk in the night and was about to leave when a giant stick insect from the trees on the hill above landed on my windscreen.

I didn’t want it to die in the car park so in order to protect it and get a few shots I drove it home, carefully so as not to dislodge it, slowly as it hung on in the wind.

When I got home I loosened it from its grip on the wiper blade and put it on the roof of the car where it wandered a while before I handed it off to a tree.

It was happy to climb on the green, most creatures are happy to get back to their nature.

Maybe because there’s no problem in nature, only in the thinking mind.

© Mark BerkeryClick on those pictures for a closer lookand click again.

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Weevil Days …

At rest, unworried by the missing lower rear leg. Weevil being what weevil does.

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Still and unmoved by the giant nearby. A perfect opportunity to become acquainted.

Up on the stick he became more lively, familiar sense of wood underfoot, antennae outstretched alert.

For whatever weevil might find. A tangle of dried roots at the end of a stick. That led back to the green.

Weevil on the wheelybin lid – yellow for recyclables, just sitting there, unaware of the swirl of the world beyond.

So I got a stick and encouraged it to climb on. It obliged, and after a short journey and a few shots I sent it into a nearby tree.

Happy it seemed to be on the green again, it lifted those long legs and disappeared into the shimmering sense of nature.

No problem … on his little weevil mind.

© Mark BerkeryClick on those pictures for a closer lookand click again.

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Life Goes On …

Green Shield Bug with a drop of water from the hose, waiting out the shower.

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Variations on the angle of approach, for background/contrast and eye level contact.

Pluck a leaf and raise ‘im up. Alarms the bug for a moment, enough to send it into hiding.

But not for long … turn the leaf over and there it is, exposed and hesitant – perceiving no danger.

Way to go … the upside down view of the world. Sometimes I think everything needs upending, for a fresher view.

A green shield bug at the end of summer, loitering on the greenery. Hasn’t yet been moved to insert that needle mouth into a vein for the available nourishment.

But it will … everything lives off something else. Until it in turn dies and feeds another form, ever burgeoning, ad infinitum.

The life behind unmoving …

© Mark BerkeryClick on those pictures for a closer lookand click again.

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I Spy

As I was passing the Blue Banded Bee hotel I saw this on the wooden base below. A dead fly with no ants in attendance. And knew from experience what it signified.

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Means there was nothing of it left to eat, or the ants surely would … A jumping spider I saw the day before had already extracted any nourishment, here with a new meal.

Change the approach angle slightly, keeping spider eyes the centre of attention, to get more of the scene in focus. You never know what you’ve got until it’s done.

Another angle, another opportunity to investigate spider eating fly. The small hole, about 4mm diameter, probably home to something else.

After the spider was done s/he was energetic enough to go in search of new pastures, probably looking for a mate. As all things do in time, separate and apart. … Such is life, or living.

I keep an eye on the Blue Banded Bee hotels in case of invasion by undesirables, like the fly.

But who’s to say the fly is not good for the ecology of the BBB’s nest site. Not me …

So I largely leave them be, or chase them off if I think they are too many for comfort.

They harass the BBB’s as they approach the nest and I’m not sure what they are up to.

Parasitising the BBB, or playing tag, or who knows … I sometimes intervene.

The fly is subject to a higher authority.

Aren’t we all …

© Mark BerkeryClick on those pictures for a closer lookand click again.

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Invisibility …

A kind of shield bug, a pair mating on a tree trunk in the garden.

… helps when you walk slowly around the trunk of a tree and the birds are about, if you want to survive.

These creatures look like they’ve been surviving since the dinosaurs.

© Mark BerkeryClick on those pictures for a closer lookand click again.

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Sleepy Wasp

Just a little smudge of black on the wood at first sight.

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It occurred to me to stop and look, just in case it was something to shoot.

Because often you don’t know until you get up close what it is.

And it was. She started to move soon after but not enough to fly away.

Yet … But it’s inevitable, every flying creature takes to the wing soon enough.

Gotta work fast sometimes …

Little black wasp found sleeping on a Blue Banded Bee hotel one morning.

© Mark BerkeryClick on those pictures for a closer lookand click again.

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Focus …

Was a little shy to begin with, presenting only a shot from the rear at first. Quietly does it, take what comes …

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Only sensation, calm established, no alarming events in his little mind to relate as I come side-on. Aiming for profile …

Angle a little better, background still too dark and empty, but looking more his elegant self. Character emerging …

Communication established, an absence of the force of movement keeps the peace. The basis for introductions …

That’s better, a relaxed fly doing some preening exercises, indicates he’s focused within and likely to remain so a while.

Probably a good time to maneuver for the shot I want. Getting there in increments – move, frame, shoot, maneuver …

And there we are, more or less. A background window of blue sky comes into frame and he’s in his element. Little beauty …

While watering in a corner of the garden a drone fly did dance.

He came and went among the leaves, inviting me to a few shots.

Thinking he’d be gone before I got back, got the camera quicker.

Surprise, surprise, there he was. Still dancing around the shadows.

© Mark BerkeryClick on those pictures for a closer lookand click again.

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Lil Bee

On the calendula, collecting pollen for her little ones to be.

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A little nectar too, for her own wellbeing, to keep on being a bee.

Preening in another flower, what bees do by their nature.

Basking in the yellow, cooler than red, colours matter, to this bee.

A bee in the garden on a hot summers day.

© Mark BerkeryClick on those pictures for a closer lookand click again.

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Odd Fellows

Bug on a seedpod in the local bush, always found on this same plant, protected by design.

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Hopper of a kind. Fell from a tree in the wild garden onto my arm, a forest of another kind.

I leave butterfly’s to lay in the garden, even growing greenery just for them. And some days the place is full of new ones.

The witchitty grubs are getting at the roots of the butterfly bush plants, but still enough flowering for these tiny midges.

Another bug caught at a meal of pollen. Messy table manners, but also a way to carry a little food for later.

Another little hopper from the garden. They all have their season, coming and going according to conditions only they know.

Called a soldier fly I think, resting on the fridge outdoors downstairs. It’s interesting the creatures that come and go.

A wasp I believe, though haven’t seen it before this summer. Hanging around the orange tail resin bee hotel – lovely blue eyes.

The one blue banded bee, it slept in the same spot for two months then disappeared one night. Such is life, and death …

It has been unusually dry this summer and even the bees, who have protected hives, aren’t coming out this year in any numbers. A few showed up earlier in the season but the hives have been quiet since.

Maybe after a little rain things will change, we’ll see. It seems to have arrived in the last couple days but will take some time to have its effect on most of the smaller life forms.

© Mark BerkeryClick on those pictures for a closer lookand click again.

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