Nature's Place

The East …

She took position at the bottom of stairway for the day and wouldn’t be discouraged. … Though she kept a metre distance, vocal warning if I got too close.

*Click on the pictures for a proper look … and click again

The curlew is used to the area, frequently seen exploring at night. … They find an out of the way place to wait out the day. … A little out of place on the stairway though.

I don’t mind, all are welcome, unless they prove to be intrusive – like the ibis recently eating all the seedlings. … But this one likes fish, so no problem there.

… of Bris, the Bush Stone Curlew came visiting. Walking past the bottom of the front stairway and there she was, just standing still.

They are commonly seen here at night darting about in search of … what things we search for at night, food and friends perhaps.

Never has one taken to the garden for the day before. Unlike most other birds these Curlews are nocturnal, and hide away during daylight.

That’s two night birds visiting the house this last week, and the Frogmouth was on the fence as I passed by, at arms length again, untroubled.

The Curlew did enjoy the cats leftover fish though, and even broke its safety space and came within a few inches while I put more food in the bowl – hungry.

If you can make space, and leave well enough alone – inside is out – they will come. The natural creatures, expressions of the will to live, and more.

Representations of the divine. The simple pleasure of knowing nature’s primary sense, a sense of peace.

© Mark Berkery ……. Click on those pictures for a closer look

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17 Responses

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  1. naturebackin said, on 22/04/2019 at 6:02 am

    What a perfectly beautiful bird and what a privilege to have it so trusting.

    • Mark said, on 22/04/2019 at 4:06 pm

      It’s a pleasure to get up close, for sure. With respect for their wild nature, their apparent innocence an be deceiving of a more savage nature.

  2. Lori M-I said, on 20/04/2019 at 12:43 pm

    Lovely! Cheers

  3. Dee said, on 19/04/2019 at 3:02 pm

    Wonderful bird, wonderful photos and words…thank you so much for sharing your work Mark.

  4. Cate said, on 19/04/2019 at 11:48 am

    Happy to see photos of your latest visitor, Mark. And as always, I enjoyed your gentle reflections. Nicely done.

  5. chicoyaya said, on 19/04/2019 at 10:47 am

    Lovely close ups!!

  6. Lissa Clayton said, on 19/04/2019 at 10:24 am

    “The bush stone-curlew usually breeds once during July and January. Their nest is a scrape or small clearing on bare ground, often near bush or a fallen limb. Two light stone to buff eggs with brown blotches are laid and incubated by both parents. Babies are full grown in about 50 days and the parents teach them to eat food by dropping it in front of them. If danger threatens, the parents will carry their young off under their wings.” The last bit I find particularly fascinating. Good parenting. Beautiful birds.

    • Mark said, on 19/04/2019 at 10:59 am

      Yes, bush stone …

      There’s every permutation in nature. We are supposed to be the optimal form, for now – as we seem to be on the way out.

  7. Michael Scandling said, on 19/04/2019 at 9:19 am

    MarK, these are fantastic, but I wonder if your post somehow got clipped. Some copy and some photos seem to be missing.

    • Mark said, on 19/04/2019 at 11:00 am

      Thanks Michael. If that’s what you’re seeing I can’t explain it. I have viewed it on a few devices here and everything shows.

      • Michael Scandling said, on 19/04/2019 at 11:22 am

        I think the paragraphs got mixed up. Your title ends with an ellipsis, and there’s another ellipsis several paragraphs in.

        • Mark said, on 19/04/2019 at 11:31 am

          That’s not several paragraphs in. What’s between the ellipsis is separate, as stand-alone captions to the separate pictures. It’s apparent on my laptop, maybe looks different on your device.

        • Michael Scandling said, on 19/04/2019 at 12:02 pm

          OK. Thanks. That explains it. It does look different on my iPhone and on my iPad. I haven’t looked at it on my computer. Anyway, great photographs!


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