Nature's Place

Masked Bee

1-P1100988_filtered Mark Berkery

Click the pictures for the bigger – and better – version.

4-P1100863_filtered Mark Berkery

2-P1100905_filtered Mark Berkery

3-P1100889_filtered Mark Berkery

5-P1100869_filtered Mark Berkery

Twice this year these bees have presented. They are usually too shy for a shot but circumstances dictate. And then there’s luck, what nature, or what’s it called behind, will …

The one on my finger was rescued from the water, of which there are various locations in the garden. The other landed on top of one of the bee hotels and set to preening itself, out of the way of the passing populace, some of which are predators.

A small window on the life of one of my garden friends. A passing pleasure, watching nature’s delightful little robots.

I bet they age just like me and you.

© Mark Berkery ……. Click on those pictures for a closer look
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30 Responses

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  1. Fiona McLellan / Dan Werkman said, on 27/03/2016 at 5:07 am

    Brilliant photo!!! Very unusual and clarity is amazing. Fiona

  2. Walking My Path: Mindful Wanderings in Nature said, on 26/03/2016 at 8:56 am

    Fabulous as always!

  3. afrenchgarden said, on 26/03/2016 at 1:44 am

    Thanks for sharing your special moments with the bees. Amelia

  4. David said, on 26/03/2016 at 1:38 am

    Cracking shots, Mark! These photos really do reveal an amazing looking creature.

  5. The Ring Lady said, on 25/03/2016 at 10:29 pm

    The precision and the definition on that first photo is incredible. The contrast between your finger and the bee works so well!

  6. macmsue said, on 25/03/2016 at 9:05 pm

    Fabulous photos again. I’m curious about your bee hotels if you made them how did you do it?

    • Mark said, on 25/03/2016 at 10:56 pm

      Thanks Mac. Mine are old wooden posts drilled to accommodate the bees. They are mentioned in a few posts – https://beingmark.com/?s=hotel and have a look here – http://www.sgaonline.org.au/insect-hotels/

      • macmsue said, on 26/03/2016 at 5:33 pm

        Thanks Mark, that site was brilliant. I have made a few insect hotels myself. After something consistently dammed up the end of some spare hose I made a hotel using lengths of hose stuffed into a piece of hollow log. I don’t think they like the suburb though because I haven’t seen any sign of one moving in.

        • Mark said, on 26/03/2016 at 6:23 pm

          Plastic hose is large diameter, too big for a bee to waste their time and energy filling in. Would probably sweat too. Bees aren’t fools you know. :-)

          I’ve tried lots of things the insects pass up.

          • macmsue said, on 26/03/2016 at 7:02 pm

            I used pieces of the plastic hose they were consistently blocking, that’s why I’m surprised they haven’t taken up in the new site. Perhaps they don’t like the concept of many neighbours. I have bamboo, wood etc in other places. It could have been wasps.

            • Mark said, on 26/03/2016 at 9:01 pm

              I have had a leaf-cutter bee lay in plastic tube, not left out for that reason, but only the once. They often use the folds of rags left lying on a table under shelter. You just never know, but they do have preferences, don’t they.

            • macmsue said, on 27/03/2016 at 9:14 pm

              I have no idea what was using the garden hose but it looked like the end was sealed with a mud plug.

            • Mark said, on 28/03/2016 at 3:40 pm

              Could have been a mud wasp but unless you see it … speculation.

  7. Lilka Raphael said, on 25/03/2016 at 12:04 pm

    Awesome photographs! I’ve never seen these kind before. Thanks for sharing!

  8. David said, on 25/03/2016 at 8:37 am

    Very unusual, to me, looking bees. Almost looks as though an artist created them for a movie set. And of course some fantastic photos that let me see what I would otherwise probably never see.

  9. Cate said, on 25/03/2016 at 8:23 am

    Wow, Mark! What a beauty!

  10. standingoutinmyfield said, on 25/03/2016 at 6:17 am

    Gorgeous bees! I think Australia has the highest diversity of this family, Colletidae


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